Speaker Profile: Michael Gilmour

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Michael Gilmour
Founder — ParkLogic
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FAST FACTS

Session Name: Monetization for Registrars and Registries
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Number of years in the domain industry:  15 years
Now reading: Battleframe
Now watching: Enterprise
Best city for conferences: Los Angeles, CA
 

Q&A

Describe your company.

Established in 2007, ParkLogic provides professional domain investors with both a highly experienced team and a domain management platform that maximizes the revenue generated from domain traffic. The ParkLogic team saw there was a real need in the industry for a disciplined analytical approach to domain acquisition, management and disposal. The Next generation of the ParkLogic platform was designed with the knowledge and experience of the past decade to help continue to increase our client's returns into the future.

 

What can attendees look forward to during the session?

During the session, I will outline the tools that ParkLogic has built to help registrars and registries extract the value from their data to directly impact their bottom line.

 

What attendees will learn from the session?
Attendees will leave with a few simple steps that will assist them in accessing a new revenue stream with little to no work on their part.

 

What am I most looking forward to at the upcoming NamesCon?

For the first time I will have my wife and our two daughters with me at NamesCon. Over the years, both of my daughters have heard about what their dad does while overseas at conferences, but this will be the first time they will see it first hand. It’s also going to be great introducing them to all of the great friends I’ve made in the domain industry.

 

What kinds of changes to you foresee within the industry in the next five years?

The domain industry will continue to mature as consolidation occurs at the registry and registrar levels. The new gTLDs will become more mainstream while .com will still be the benchmark upon which all others are measured. Traffic monetization will move in the direction of being hyper-local on a global scale and deliver closer to the true value of traffic. Sales will continue to grow but at a modest level that is commensurate with the global growth of the domain industry.

 

What's something most people don’t know about you? 

I love writing and last year I published my first science-fiction book, Battleframe (Book one of the Mindwars). I’m now halfway through book number two and I’m really looking forward to having that one published in the next few months.

 

What advice can you offer those who are just getting their start in the domain industry?

I think the most important thing to do is listen, watch and act slowly. Listen to what people are saying but more specifically, watch those who are building real value rather than just those that are all talk. There isn’t a need to make any rushed decisions, so take your time in getting to know many of the great people in the industry who have been around a long time. Get their advice — you may be surprised when it’s freely given.

 

What was one of your biggest “Aha!” moments in life?
The day after I bought my first domain name, it received a click and earned ten cents. I knew at the point in time that all I had to do was get more domains that received clicks to earn a big bucket of money.

 

Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What lessons did that person teach you?

My business partner, David Gibbs. He has taught me an enormous amount about the importance of being really detailed and focused. He would have to be one of the most impressive analysts I know, and this combined with his technical process expertise helps ParkLogic really dig into the core of what is happening with domain traffic.

 

Where is your favourite place to escape?

This may seem really funny but I love sitting on the couch with my laptop and write another chapter of my science-fiction book. When I’m there, I’m not just typing on another computer but I’m on an adventure with heroes and villains. I had a person ask me why I like writing books and I answered, “Because I want to find out what happens next.” Readers sometimes forget that writers also have a desire to find out what is going to happen to their characters as they write — so to the couch I go!


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